dynamicafrica:

Kenyan Writer Okwiri Oduor Wins 2014 Caine Prize.
At the annual Caine Prize for African Fiction awards ceremony held last night in London, five highly esteemed young writers representing various parts of the continent sat in anticipation of the announcement of the 15th award winner to follow in the footsteps of the likes of Binyavanga Wainaina and NoViolet Bulawayo.
After a few days touring the English capital and attending interviews, months of waiting, wondering and worrying had all come down to a single night. Present were the five shortlisted candidates: Efemia Chela from both Ghana and Zambia for her humorous story Chicken, South Africa’s Diane Awerbuck for Phosphorescence, Zimbabwe’s Tendai Huchu for The Intervention, Kenya’s Billy Kahora for The Gorilla’s Apprentice, along with the tragic news of the passing of South African literary Nadine Gordimer whose death had been announced on the same day. Nigerian writer Ben Okri also gave a speech concerning the missing girls in Nigeria and the devastating effects that Boko Haram’s acts of terror have had on the country.
In contrast to last year’s shortlisted candidates and winner, no West Africans made the cut and instead, this year’s chosen writers reflected a much broader and diverse group of individuals from around the continent.
The announcement was made by the Chair of Judges, Jackie May MBE at a private dinner held at the Bodleian Library in Oxford. Kenyan writer Okwiri Oduor was named this year’s Caine Prize winner. She was quoted as saying that she is, “so hopeful and grateful about this thing we call African literature”.
On top of receiving £500 as a nominee, she took home the grand sum of £10, 000 as well. Okwiri’s ‘My Father’s Head’ was first published in ‘Feast, Famine and Potluck’ (Short Story Day Africa, South Africa, 2013).
Wainaina announced this as a win for Kenya, on his Twitter account, and last year’s winner, Nigerian Tope Folarin also took to the social media site to congratulate Okwiri.

dynamicafrica:

Kenyan Writer Okwiri Oduor Wins 2014 Caine Prize.

At the annual Caine Prize for African Fiction awards ceremony held last night in London, five highly esteemed young writers representing various parts of the continent sat in anticipation of the announcement of the 15th award winner to follow in the footsteps of the likes of Binyavanga Wainaina and NoViolet Bulawayo.

After a few days touring the English capital and attending interviews, months of waiting, wondering and worrying had all come down to a single night. Present were the five shortlisted candidates: Efemia Chela from both Ghana and Zambia for her humorous story Chicken, South Africa’s Diane Awerbuck for Phosphorescence, Zimbabwe’s Tendai Huchu for The Intervention, Kenya’s Billy Kahora for The Gorilla’s Apprentice, along with the tragic news of the passing of South African literary Nadine Gordimer whose death had been announced on the same day. Nigerian writer Ben Okri also gave a speech concerning the missing girls in Nigeria and the devastating effects that Boko Haram’s acts of terror have had on the country.

In contrast to last year’s shortlisted candidates and winner, no West Africans made the cut and instead, this year’s chosen writers reflected a much broader and diverse group of individuals from around the continent.

The announcement was made by the Chair of Judges, Jackie May MBE at a private dinner held at the Bodleian Library in Oxford. Kenyan writer Okwiri Oduor was named this year’s Caine Prize winner. She was quoted as saying that she is, “so hopeful and grateful about this thing we call African literature”.

On top of receiving £500 as a nominee, she took home the grand sum of £10, 000 as well. Okwiri’s ‘My Father’s Head’ was first published in ‘Feast, Famine and Potluck’ (Short Story Day Africa, South Africa, 2013).

Wainaina announced this as a win for Kenya, on his Twitter account, and last year’s winner, Nigerian Tope Folarin also took to the social media site to congratulate Okwiri.

factecards:

In South Africa, you may find this young man sitting on the side of Empire Road. He provides book reviews instead of begging. He reads all of these books and provides reviews for people passing by. If you like the review, he will try to sell you the book. This is how he makes a living. - http://factecards.com/south-africa-may-find-young/ - see more factE Cards at - http://factECards.com

factecards:

In South Africa, you may find this young man sitting on the side of Empire Road. He provides book reviews instead of begging. He reads all of these books and provides reviews for people passing by. If you like the review, he will try to sell you the book. This is how he makes a living. - http://factecards.com/south-africa-may-find-young/ - see more factE Cards at - http://factECards.com

yagazieemezi:

The Forgotten Kingdom tells the story of Atang, a young man living in Johannesburg who travels back to Lesotho – the country of his birth – to bury his father. Atang is an angry, bitter character who feels estranged from his homeland, but as the film progresses, a chain of events forces him to embark on a journey of self-discovery across the country that he had forgotten and, ultimately, to re-evaluate his relationship to it.

5centsapound:

Marco Casino: Staff Riding (South Africa), 
via photographicmuseumofhumanity

Staff riding, the local slang for train surfing, is a widespread phenomenon in SA. Katlehong is one of the largest townships in South Africa and has played a key role in the history of the struggle against apartheid. The population is strongly multiethnic: all the eleven South Africa’s official languages are spoken in the township.

Almost the total majority of surfers are kids under 25. Amputations and death are really common. The Prasa Metrorail, the SA train company, is one of the foundations of their society.This connection between train and citizens remained very strong over time. The spectacular and risky act of train surfing becomes the framework to tell the Katlehong’s young people social fabric.This place has been the epicenter of the anti-apartheid’s guerrillas, and on the eve of the twentieth anniversary of the facts that we all know , the situation of segregation has remained more or less unchanged in daily life.

In a context where violence , rampant poverty , abuse of alchool/drugs and infant birth/AIDS are the masters , the train surfing is configured as the search for a social redemption that will never come for the characters of this story . Staff Riding is part of a long-term project about the township lifestyle 20 years later the struggle against apartheid.

see more via video

fashizblackdiary:

South African singer & media personality Nandi Mngoma @ the 2014 Durban July Fest.

fashizblackdiary:

South African singer & media personality Nandi Mngoma @ the 2014 Durban July Fest.

Jesus Walks With Kanye

just-let-em-eat-cake:

"Jesus Walks" offers church minus The Church. And no where else does a personal paean sound so urgent than when backed by a military order to march and a gospel choir building to a crescendo as snares hiss to attention. Lesser artists reflect the zeitgeist; Kanye invites us into his psyche as a way to reflect on our own. What we so often see as bloated self-perception is his deliberate self-presentation. In the service of inspiring others, Kanye walks. - AYESHA SIDDIQI

To mark the 10th anniversary of The College Dropout, SPIN has asked a different writer to take on each track. Read it here.

 ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥  ♥A TRUE LOVE STORY NEVER ENDS ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

A TRUE LOVE STORY NEVER ENDS

cmykaffir:

It has become embedded in the Batswana people to name the offsprings and award names that reflect or depict the great work of God. Every Setswana name revolves around the deeds or aspirations and plans of the Almighty. When looking at the names (illustrated) you will learn that every one of the names reflects on the happiness, sadness and hope brought upon by God. Each name is a symbol to the parents of what they want to see from you or what your birth meant at that moment in time.

C,X,Q,V,J,Z (these alphabets do not exist in the Setswana vocabulary) U,H,Y( these alphabets do exist however we do not have names that begin with them).

Information provided by: Gaopalelwe Nke | Illustration Gifs by Thandiwe Tshabalala a.k.a CMYKaffir.

littlemissconceptions:

The view from 10 floors up at my favourite place to watch the World Cup - The Skyline Fanclub in Braamfontein., 17 Wolmarans Street. 
Click through for more information. 

littlemissconceptions:

The view from 10 floors up at my favourite place to watch the World Cup - The Skyline Fanclub in Braamfontein., 17 Wolmarans Street. 

Click through for more information. 

youmeandmyiphone:

Atop the Lawson Tower, in the revolving restaurant - Wits, johannesburg

youmeandmyiphone:

Atop the Lawson Tower, in the revolving restaurant - Wits, johannesburg

alphabetzoosa:

'WOZA SISI'- Come sister

'As I walk around Johannesburg CBD, I notice an influx of many street hairstylists stationed in different intersections on the pavement. Woza Sisi is a photo series investigating ways in which migrant women negotiate, navigate and shape the complex space they encounter in Johannesburg CBD as street hairstylists. It looks into ways in which the women position themselves; how they use and negotiate urban spaces.'

The photo-zine includes images from the series. The layout is clean and simple. The grid formation is used as an design element to represent the display boards used for advertising the different hairstyles. The publication bound is finished with braided synthetic hair, significant to the subject matter.

Zine created and written by. Dahlia Maubane

Alphabet Zoo zine Collection Exhibit A. Zine I of X